Elliot’s First Trip To Camotes Island | Traveling With A Pet

Live.

Laugh.

Woof!

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Elliot in Camotes Island.

Camotes Island holds a special place in our hearts. It has been our favorite paradise to visit when we need to escape the busy life in the city and want some dose of the sea.

For the nth time, we visited the island again. But this time, we’re taking our furry bundle of joy, Elliot, on his first ever trip. (See how to get a local transport permit in Cebu here.)

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Playing in the sand.

Day 1

It was a fine day and the ocean was calm. We were thankful that the weather was with us. We almost missed the second ferry trip to the island, good thing we made it before it set forth. Another great thing was, we were allowed not to put Elliot inside the cage as long as we will stay on the lower deck.

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The ride was relatively smooth. We felt proud of Elliot because he was very brave. At first, I worried about him getting sea-sick, contrary to that, he was still very enthusiastic when we arrived on the island.

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Ace and Demi plus Elliot.

We rented a motorcycle so we can freely tour the island at any time of our convenience. We headed immediately to Santiago Bay to find a resort where pets are allowed to stay. Luckily, Bellavista Mare does.

After putting our things, we went to Pito’s Sutukil which is located in the beach area to have our lunch. After eating, we took Elliot for a walk in the wide shore. Elliot had so much fun playing and digging holes here and there. Ace and I really enjoyed watching him having fun like a little kid’s first time outdoor.

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Nanay and Elliot playing in the sand.

We decided to just stay in Santiago Bay on that day because we had to let Elliot get some res. We wanted to wait for the sunset but Elliot had sand all over his face and we needed to clean him up. We headed back to the resort. He fell asleep right after he was cleaned up. (I guess he was very tired.)

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Don’t be scared, Elliot.

Day 2

Elliot woke up early on our second day. He looked lively and excited for the day. He didn’t know we were taking him on his first swimming experience.

After breakfast, we changed to our swimming clothes and hit the beach. It was a low tide, knowing Santiago Bay, the shore stretches far during low tide. Ace hesitated to swim with us but we had to while the sun was not too hot.

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Good boy!

Our little boy was a bit scared but he eventually fought his fear. I can’t be any prouder of this furry baby. I let him follow me to the deeper water but his instinct was telling him to find the land. 😀

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Ace and Elliot.

Elliot seemed to enjoy it although, he clung to me most of the time because he felt cold. I noticed that when Ace dives his bod under the water, Elliot swam to him as if he’s ready to rescue his dad. That’s so sweet. I guess that’s a dog’s instinct, or what?

22552487_1727405890636801_4672825853317002151_nWe only stayed there for 15 minutes because the sun was starting to hurt and Elliot needed to drink water. So, we went back to the resort to wash up.

 

At around 11:00 am, we went to Lake Danao to have our lunch.

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We wanted to try their kayaking activity but the weather was too hot, we’re afraid Elliot couldn’t handle it. We roamed around the area after eating our lunch and went back to Mangudlong Rock Resort.

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Dig deeper, Elliot!

There were not too many guests at the resort. Elliot had a great time digging holes and fitting his body in it. We stayed there for an hour or so before going back to our resort. (We thought Elliot must have burnt few calories with all those digging.)

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Day 3

As we expected, Elliot woke up a little bit late the next morning. I wanted to go out to smell the morning dew, he got up and followed me outside although still feeling drowsy. Such a clingy pup!

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Elliot’s morning view. 

It’s our last day on the island. 😀 As soon as hubby got up, we went to a nearby bakery to have our breakfast. After that, Ace and I took another quick dip in the sea. Then, we went back to the resort to wash up and pack our things. While we were busy packing, Elliot, on the other hand, was sleeping in the corner. (The pup was dead tired.)

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Ace and Demi plus Elliot. 

And that capped Elliot’s first trip in the Lost Horizon of the South. 

Elliot may not be able to talk to us and tell us how he felt but we feel his happiness. Although we had to admit, he was HAPPIER when we arrived home. (Guess “there’s no place like home” trite also applies to pets, huh?)

Over to you, have you traveled with a pet? We’d love to hear from you, tell us about it!

’til Elliot’s next adventure with us!

Keep safe!

Love, Ace and Demi and Elliot.

 

 

 

 

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Beyond Mysteries: Sohoton Cove National Park|Part 2

Here’s Part 2 of our Bucas Grande and Sohoton Cove tour.

Our next stop was the Sohoton Cove National Park Tourism Office where we had to register our names and transfer to a smaller boat in order to explore Sohoton Cove.

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From afar, we already saw many boats surrounding the registration building. It took us almost ten minutes to find a space to dock ours. We saw many people waiting for their turn to register.

When it was our turn, we were told that they’re not accepting further visitors for the day. Wait, what? It so happen that there were too many people on that day and that they couldn’t accommodate everyone. 😥

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I went back to the registration table and plead. With my persuasive attitude, I was told that they might reopen the registration after two or three hours when there is already an available boat. But we had to be on stand-by because it’s a first-come-first-serve basis and they’re not accepting advance booking payment.

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We thought, we would be wasting our time waiting for them to reopen. 😦 Again, I gathered guts and with my convincing power, we were able to secure the first slot once it would be reopened.

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While waiting, we went back to our boat and our boatmen steered it to another part of the island. There, we took a dip in the water. At first I was hesitant to join the gang because the water was deep blue which means it was very deep. I had my life vest but I was worried about what could be lurking underneath. (Eh, sharks, crocodiles. :p nyahaha)

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After about 30 minutes, we were called and told that we could already register. (That’s faster than we thought.) We hurriedly got off from the water and went back to the registration area. After paying for the necessary fees for the tour, we were given life vests and we waited for our tour guide.

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We were divided into two groups because one boat could only have seven passengers the most. Our tour guide introduced himself and our boatman. They seemed to be very experienced and have known the place like the back of their hands.

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Then he told us that we were already about to enter the Sohoton National Park. He pointed to a cove and said that we were to pass through it. From a far, I doubted our boat to go through it because it was very small.

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The entrance.

During high tides, the cave is impassable not unless you dive underwater. This is where Sohoton Cove got its namesake — from the Visayan word so-oton which means to pass through a small opening.

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The entrance.

And tada! We’re now in Sohoton Cove National Park!

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See how small it was.
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Tiil sa Kabayo or Horse’s Feet.

Not far from the entrance, is this oddly shaped rock which they consider a very important landmark. They fondly call it “Tiil sa Kabayo”  or a horse’s feet.

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The fjord, and these muffin-like islets inside the cove looked very similar to each other. Those who are unfamiliar of the place would certainly get lost, even our guides admitted that they could be lost, too if not because of that Tiil sa Kabayo landmark near the entryway.

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As we went deeper the Sohoton Cove National Park, our guide continued feeding us information about the place. He also showed us this very unique limestone cliff. I said it’s unique because all islets inside the cove are forested but this cliff’s face. We just forgot its name. Sorry.

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Our first stop for the tour was Hagukan Cave. It got its name from the term “haguk” which means snore. They said, if you’re lucky, you could hear snores from the cave which is created by the waves that goes in and out of it. Guess, we’re not the lucky ones because we did not hear it. Pffft!

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Taken from the inside of the cave.

For one to enter the cave, we had to dive for 3-5 seconds through the entrance of the cave. If we had a little luck  that time, that was because the tide did not reach the ceiling of the entrance yet, thus we only had to float upon entering. Inside was a huge cavern hiding healthy stalactites.

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After swimming inside Hagukan Cave, we boarded back our boat and head to our next stop, the Magkukuob Cave. Only few of us went inside because we were told that the only exit was to jump from a 15-feet platform. I did not do that but Ace did.

We skipped the Jellyfish island because we ran out of time and the tide was rising. We had to be out the cove before it submerged in the water and trap us inside the National Park. It was getting dark when we arrived at the Tourism Center. We hurriedly transferred to our bigger boat so we could go home.

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It was getting dark on our way back to the port of Hayanggabon. We were rewarded with the glimpse of a wonderful sunset while cruising through Sohoton Bay.

We really had a great time exploring Bucas Grande’s pride. With positive attitude, we were able to make those misadventures an adventure itself. Because we believe that the twists and turns that we had experienced was what made our experience worthwhile and worth telling. 😀

Thank you, Bucas Grande for such a wonderful experience!

Over to you, have you had misadventures that are worth telling? We’d love to hear it from you. Leave us some words.

‘Til our next adventure!

Keep safe!

Love, Ace and Demi.

 

P.S A huge thanks to our friend Annel Hope Mayuga and to her wonderful family for adopting us during our four days stay in Surigao. Thank you for your warm welcome and for making this venture possible. ’til next time.

Bucas Grande Island & Sohoton Bay | Part 1

Let me start this post with an aerial photo of Bucas Grande Islands which would surely ignite every itchy feet’s curiosity.

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Photo credit to the owner. (Source)

We know it’s a cliche, everyone says to lower our expectations. But, could you blame us for expecting too much? Photos posted on Facebook , Instagram, and other social media sites spell HIGH EXPECTATION.

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We already had posted a photo diary about of Surigao experience here. An invite from a good friend brought us to the beautiful City of Island Adventures and gave us the chance to experience a non-stop island hopping. 😀

So, how was our Bucas Grande Islands and Sohoton Bay experience?

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Port of Hayanggabon.

It was already 7:00am when we arrived in Surigao. A van picked us up to bring us to the Port of Hayanggabon where our Bucas Grande Island adventure awaited. We dropped by our host’s house to leave some of our belongings and immediately resumed our journey for the day.

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Our boat.

At the port, a medium-sized motorized boat waited for us. We quickly get on the boat and had our breakfast on board. We were very busy filling our hungry tummies, without knowing, we were already in the middle of Sohoton Bay.

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Sohoton Bay

Our major tour for the day was Sohoton Cove National Park. Since it was still a high tide, our boatmen toured us to other islands around Sohoton Bay. Our first stop is the Crystal and Bolitas Cave.

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The Gang.

Unfortunately, I did not have a decent photo inside the cave. But just a heads up, Crystal Cave is a huge cavern with stalagmites and stalactites shining like crystals while Bolitas Cave got its name from the strange rock formations inside that resembles to that of a pellet. (Here’s a perfect post that best describes what I’m trying to say.)

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A boat-shaped rock.

After we explored the two caves and done our photo-ops, we hopped back to our boat to explore another island. As our boatmen expertly maneuvered our boat avoiding the shallow water, we noticed this boat-like rock which is perfectly shaped by time. Look how amazing nature is!

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After a few minutes, we were in front of another island. It was fronting a cliff and it looked like a developed resort. We agreed not to drop there and just find another place where we can grill our fish for lunch so we won’t run out of time.

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Demi basking under the sun.

Our boatmen brought us to this nearly isolated islet. We saw a small hut when we were about to dock our boat. We learned that the hut was for the caretaker of the island but no one was around except the two kind big dogs. But not too long, a small banca arrived and we reckoned he was the said caretaker because the dogs greeted him sweetly.

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He was very kind and told us that he lives alone in this part of the island but there are frequent visitors who drop by, too.

For a while, we had the whole island for ourselves. While some of us prepared our food, others were having a great time exploring the island, taking Instagram worthy photos. I couldn’t help sharing this photo below that best describes how ‘struggle was real’ just to show that beautiful photos on Facebook and IG. 😀

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Behind the scenes.
SOhoton Behind The scene
Behind the scenes.

😀 Anyway, after our lunch and that crazy photo-ops, another group of visitors were headed to our spot. We decided to pack up and gave them the chance to enjoy the place like we did.

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Next stop, Sohoton Cove National Park. But I will save that on the later post. 😀 So, kindly stay tuned for that.

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Ace and Demi enjoying the white beach in an island of Bucas Grande.

We hope you enjoyed our Bucas Grande Island and Sohoton Bay photo diary.

 

‘Til our next story.

Keep safe!

Love, Ace and Demi

 

P.S A huge thanks to our friend Annel Hope Mayuga and to her wonderful family for adopting us during our four days stay in Surigao. Thank you for your warm welcome and for making this venture possible. ’til next time.

Island Living | The Sipaway Island Way.

“Your life is an island separated from all other islands and continents. Regardless of how many boats you send to other shores or how many ships arrive your shores, you yourself are an island separated by its own pains, secluded in its happiness.” ~ Kahlil Gibram

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When people hear the word island, the image of a wide stretched beach, the turquoise water, and the fine white sand surely comes to our mind first. We forget that this is not what an island is all about.

The island is the people, their way of living and their laid-back life.

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A photo of a father and son from taking a dip in the beach.

Today, let us take you to Sipaway Island — a small island in San Carlos City, Negros Occidental. This is also geographically known as Refugio Island.

Sipaway can be reached by a bangka (an outriggered boat) from San Carlos City for about 10 minutes. The bangka will dock in any of the five ports in the island depending on the majority of the passengers’ destination. (Yes, you’ve read it right. The island has five ports in different area but the most used are the Dap-dap and Ermita ports.)

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Bangkas ready for a fluvial parade docked in Ermita Port.

Since the hubby’s relatives who are living in Negros wanted to meet me, we decided to pay them a short visit. When his family learned that we will be coming, they thought of having a mini-reunion in Sipaway.

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Sipaway Island

Hubby toured me around the place on our second day.

Sipaway Island has a land area that only stretches 7 kilometers in length and 1.5 kilometers wide. It only consists of two barangays (district), San Juan and Ermita. These two barangays are connected with well-paved concrete roads.

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A well-paved road connecting the two districts.

The mode of transportation in the area are tricycles and motorcycles. But there are private resorts in the area that offer bicycles for rent. Hubby and I rented a motorbike to tour the whole place because our body were not in good condition to cycle. I personally thought it was a good choice knowing that it was a Sunday and we will be going back to Cebu in the afternoon because we have to work on the next day. It really saved us time and energy. 😀

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Ace and Demi in Sipaway Island 2017

Our first stop was the oldest Balete Tree in the island. The last time Ace visited Sipaway was 10 years ago, so he was also surprised that the tree is now fenced inside San Juan Elementary School. The school was closed so we were not able to get inside.

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A 200-century old Balete Tree in Barangay San Juan.

As we continued our tour to the tip of the island, I chanced upon this couple who came from fishing something for lunch. How sweet is that?

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A husband and wife coming from a day of fishing.

Sipaway island has a population of about 4000 people. The primary source of living is fishing and extracting oil from coconut’s dried meat (locally called copra).

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Lush coconut vegetation in the area.

Recently, the place already have a 24-hour supply of electricity. They also have a supply of clean drinking water from the mainland San Carlos City, although not all households have their own faucets yet. So some have to wait in line to fetch water from a public faucet in designated areas. At least, now they don’t have to go to the mainland to fetch for water.

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Tatay waiting for his turn to fetch water from a public faucet.

We also learned that there is a resort in the island which is frequented by visitors. It is the Whispering Palms Island Resort. We dropped by here to supposedly just eat our lunch but we had to pay an entrance fee apart from our food. We were not going stay in the resort for long due to time constraints so we aborted our plan to have lunch inside.

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Whispering Palms Island Resort.

As we continued our tour, I saw the idyllic life of Sipawaynons. Actually, there was this part of me which envied their simple living. In every eyes of the people there, I saw contentment, I saw happiness.

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Priceless laughter from an old woman skinning firewoods to sell. Photo from Sipaway Divers.

I witnessed how peaceful this little community is. I saw how they do things that I’m pretty sure they’d been doing everyday but I did not see boredom.

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A little girl swimming with her pet. 

They don’t have the luxury to buy expensive things but they have time, precious time. Everybody knows almost everyone in this 7-kilometer community. I love that! I love how they know the people in the other side of the island contrary to not knowing your ‘roommate’ in city.

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That afternoon talk in the neighborhood. 

They have narrow streets but there is no traffic. The kids have no expensive gadgets but they’re happily playing hide and seek and other traditional games.

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Kids riding a pedal cab with their pet. 

Basically, the people in this island don’t have the modernities that we people in the big cities have. But, look how they are happy and contented with their laid back life.

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A traditional hut in the island.

Look how rich the kids with childhood fun, look how rich the people with peace and tranquility, look how rich they are with love and smiles.

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Tricycle — primary mode of transport. 

Our short sojourn in the island taught us to appreciate the life we have. It taught us contentment. It taught us to value our work, the people around us, the precious time we have for each other. 

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Treat yourself with the traditional coconut red wine locally called tuba

We may be a small island, but we are not a small people. ~Edward Heath

 

We hope you enjoyed our Sipaway Island venture.

‘Til next time.

Keep safe!

Love, Ace and Demi.

Cycling Around Olango Island | The 200-peso Story

Everybody is hyped up for summer. Got your weekends’ schedule full, yah? Most of us are planning for beach get-aways, some prefer the cold springs to beat the heat of this season. Us…we’re cycling, still.

Don’t limit your challenges. Challenge your limits, instead! 

Inspired by a famous ice cream commercial, you should be familiar of the line, “Saan aabot ang 20 pesos mo?” (Where does your 20 pesos lead you?) Remember the product? Now grab it and continue reading. 😀

Few weeks ago, I decided to challenge myself to try biking around Olango Island with just 200 pesos on hand. So, where did my 200-peso lead me? Did I survive?

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Demi in Olango Island

Let’s take a quick trivia of this island: 

Olango is part of Olango Group of Islands with its six satelite islets — Sulpa, Gilutongan (also spelled Hilutungan), Nalusuan, Caohagan, Pangan-an, and Camungi.  The islands are low-lying with elevation reaching no more than 10 metres (33 ft) above sea level.

Perfect for my activity, yah? Thanks Mr Wiki.

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Demi in Olango Island Wildlife Sanctuary 

The hubby wasn’t available because he went cycling with the Cebu Friendly Bikers Club in the highlands of Cebu City. So, I hesitated to pursue my plan because I’d never been to Olango island since. And the fact that I don’t know anyone who lives there was giving me more doubt. Because of my three awesome friends who gladly accompanied me on this venture, this 200-peso experiment was realized.

My friends and I met up at JCenter mall at 7am and hailed a jeepney bound for Punta Engano. (By the way, these jeepneys pass by Andy Hotel, Parkmall, Chong-Hua Mandaue…just in case you don’t know.) We asked the driver to drop us off at Movenpick Hotel where the port to Olango was located.

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Bird watching in Olango Island 

It was a 10-15 minute relatively smooth boat ride to the island. I forgot to tell you that we did not have an itinerary for this escape. We just knew we’re to explore the island with a bike. There are bicycles for rent in the area for as low as Php10 per hour. It was a quarter to ten o’clock when we arrived in Sta. Rosa Port. We immediately rode a tricycle to take us to Barangay Candagsao where we can rent a bike.

After five minutes, we were greeted by the smiles of friendly locals who were kind to tell us where Kuya Erwin’s bike rental place. After choosing our preferred bicycles, we signed an agreement paper and off we go.

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Bicycling around Olango island. 

Our first stop was the Tungasan Boardwalk. Unfortunately, the paseo was closed for renovation. The locals said, the storm had devasted the boarwalk very much that it was now unsafe to step on the walkway. We had no choice but to settle with the view.

After a few minutes, we proceeded to San Vicente Marine Sanctuary to eat our lunch. We were thinking of seafoods but to our disappointment, the staffs were not very friendly to us. We even felt discriminated because they prioritized their foreign guests. Our tummies were already growling but they just told us they don’t have rice even though we saw the rice on the table. Huhuh. 😥

We couldn’t stay there and drool, we headed to Olango Wildlife Sanctuary to experience the bird-watching. Contrary to what happened in the Marine Sanctuary, the staffs in the Wildlife Sanctuary were very friendly and accommodating. They even lent us a binoculars to use in the bird-watching area. Sadly, they don’t have food but chips and snacks. Huhuh…more growling of our tummies.

After repleting our eyes with the migratory birds, we went back our way and dropped by Sagastrand Restaurant to eat our lunch. Finally!!

I’m proud to say that I SURVIVED and my experiment was a SUCCESS. Information about my expenses after this. 🙂

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Ace and Demi cycling in Olango Island. 

I didn’t have enough of my biking tour in the island and the following weekend, I brought my younger brother and the hubby with me. Coincidently, the CFB team were also going. Yahoo!

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Brother and Me cycling around Olango island.

My brother and I rented our bikes in the same rental place. He chose the mountain bike but I chose the folding bike because I don’t know how to use the big bike. As a result, I caused delays of the team’s ride. (Sorry.) Gladly, they live by their name “friendly bikers” and understood my shortcoming.

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Ace cycling around Olango Island.

This time, we had our sumptuous lunch in Barangay Talima. Our good host prepared saang and grilled fish for us. We devoured the feast in just few minutes because we were all hungry.

Once again, for the second time I have proven my 200-peso experiment in Olango. 🙂 

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When in doubt, PEDAL it out. 

Here’s a breakdown of my expenses: (Day-tour in Olango Island)

  • Php30 — (back and forth) jeepney fare to and from Mandaue City (Php15)
  • Php30 — (back and forth) boat fare
  • Php6 — terminal fee (Php5 and Php1)
  • Php40 — (back and forth) tricycle fare to and from bike rental (Php20)
  • Php30 — three-hour bike rental (Php10/hour)
  • Php30 — lunch
  • Php30 — entrance fee to Bird Watching

Do the Math and that’s all my expenses.

Hence, I conclude that your 200-peso will let you survive in Olango Island. 

Just a few reminder:  **You’ll probably love to stay in the island for a long time but if you are in a day-trip make sure to be at the port before 4pm because it is the boats’ last trip to the mainland. **You can buy seafoods at a very cheap price like saang, talaba and etc., in Barangay Talima. ** Rent a bike at Kuya Erwin’s bike rental in Barangay Candagsao.

’til our next adventure.

Keep safe.
Love, Ace and Demi

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sumilon Island Sandbar | South Cebu Tour 2016

Let the waves hit your feet and the sand be your seat.

Want a quick breathe from the hustle and bustle of the city? We suggest you consider visiting Sumilon Island. Not only it’s a four-hour ride from the metropolis, it does not require you a full wallet, too.

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Ace and Demi in Sumilon Island.

This beautiful secluded island is privately owned by Bluewater Sumilon Island Resort. They generously opened their sandbar to public for a very affordable fee.

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When in Sumilon island. 

Visiting Sumilon Island Sandbar was included in our itinerary during our South Cebu Tour. We headed to this place right after our whale shark encounter.

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The Sumilon island sandbar. 

Almost half of the sandbar portion was already submerged in water when we arrived but because the water was crystal clear, it was still visible.

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The Sumilon island sandbar. 

There were not too many visitors during that time. We had a great time snorkling and enjoying the waves. After few minutes of basking in the sandbar, our tour guide offered us to tour the other part of the island. We climbed the giddy precipice which we thought is not for acrophobic individuals.

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When in Sumilon island. 

But if you resolved to conquer that fear, this spot shows a panoramic view of the mainland and a wonderful view of the ocean. So, drop that fear, honey!!! You cannot miss this!

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Ace and Demi in Sumilon Island. 

What do you say? Are you ready to visit the island?

We hope you enjoyed our travel diary of Sumilon Island. Have you been here? Tell us about it. 🙂 

 

‘Til our next adventure!

Keep safe.

Love, Ace and Demi 

P.S You might want to hear about the rest of our South Cebu Tour. Know about our Historical Visit in Oslob, our quick visit to Sanayon Site in Santander and stay updated for the rest of the places we visited by subscribing and following our site. Blessings! 

 

What To Do In Camotes Island – Travel Guide

Island days, island ways, caves, sand, and sunny rays! 

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The sea, sand, sun and me.

Who does not love an island getaway to escape the hustle and bustle of the city? I don’t don’t think there’s any of us here. Have you heard about Camotes island? I suggest you include it on your list.

CAMOTES ISLAND – “The Lost Horizon of the South”

“Camotes” means sweet potatoes in Filipino language. The island was named after that because that was the main crop that farmers grow there. This is just one of the 7,107 islands Philippines has, and one of the most beautiful. It is also called “the lost horizon of the South”. As to why, I don’t know. 🙂

Camotes Islands comprises three major islands. They are Poro, Pacijan and Ponlon. The main islands of Pacijan and Poro are connected by a 1.5-kilometre-long causeway.

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How to get there?

Camotes is located in the eastern coast of the mainland Cebu. It is two hours away by boat from Danao Port.

From Cebu North Bus terminal, ride a bus going to Carmen or you can catch a multicab or a jeepney with Danao route. It is easy to find them, Danao cabs are numbered 27 on their body. The fare is 35 pesos. If you prefer an airconditioned transportation, you can catch a V-hire from the SM terminal. The fare is 50 pesos. Tell the driver to drop you off at Danao Port.

When you reach Danao Port, you can buy a ticket for 180 pesos and 5 pesos for the terminal fee. Be there an hour before your desired boarding time if you don’t have a ticket yet because the line could be very long especially during peak season (March-May and November-January). The ride is approximately two hours, and you will arrive at Consuelo Port. Upon arrival, there are motorcycles and jeepneys for hire that offers hotel transfer for 50 pesos each. You can also rent a motorcyle for 500 pesos for a half day tour. You can choose to either drive it yourself or let the driver be your tour guide. (Some hotels offer motorbike for rent, too. Some also offer tour packages.)

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Where to stay:

There are plenty of hotels around and some locals also open their houses for backpackers. If you prefer, you can bring your own tent. Bear in mind that these hotels are no 5 star.

Here are some of the famous places to stay in the island:

  • Santiago Bay Garden Resort
  • Mangodlong Rock Resort
  • Mangodlong Paradise Beach Resort
  • Keshe Beach Resort
  • Sunset Vista Resort
  • Bellavista Mare Resort 

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What to do in the island?

We personally suggest to tour the island with a motorcycle. The famous spots are accessible and easy to find. Don’t hesitate to ask the locals if you think you’re lost. 🙂

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Here are some of the places you should visit in the island:

1.Baywalk Plaza

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It is just a few meters away from Consuelo Port and is situated in San Fransisco town. It’s a small plaza or park, perfect for picnic or you could just take a leisure walk around. The market is also near.

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2. Buho Rock Resort

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Don’t miss cliff jumping in Buho Rock. I attest you’ll regret not jumping. 😀

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3. Timubo Cave

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Next stop, is the famous Timubo Cave. You can opt to take a dip in the cold water inside the cave which is believed to heal illness.

4. Chasing the Sunset at Mangodlong Rock Resort

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The island has a nice view of the sunset if you knew the right place to witness it. For us, Mangodlong Rock Resort was that perfect spot.

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5. Lake Danao – Water Activities

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If you’re into water activities, you should not miss Lake Danao Park. Try their kayaking, waterballoon, and etc. They also have horseback riding.

6. Kanlingiw Garden and Pool

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Have your snack at Kanlingiw Garden just beside Lake Danao Park. They have this mini-zoo, too.

7. Paraiso Cave

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Another cave, you want? Drop by Paraiso Cave, too.

8. Santiago Bay

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Feel the fine, white sand on your feet and the salt on the air at the beach. Santiago Bay is a public beach which means it’s for everyone.

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Look at this wide beach.

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Perfect for people who are afraid of the deep water. And just want to get tanned.

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There are several restaurants by the beach, too. Just in case you get hungry after a long day. They serve Filipino dishes and seafoods.

 

There are still a lot of places we need to discover in the island. And hopefully, in our next visit we’ll get to explore them. 🙂 

Here’s the list of our expenses (Hubby and I shared budget but I’m writing an individual expenses for you) :

Day 1

  • Fare (Mandaue-Danao Port) – Php 30
  • Boat ticket (Danao-Camotes) – Php 180
  • Terminal fee – Php 5
  • Motorcycle fee (Php 600/2) – Php 300
  • Buho Rock Resort Entrance Fee – Php 20
  • Timubo Cave Entance Fee – Php 25
  • Lake Danao – Php 15
  • Kayaking Fee – Php 50
  • Paraiso Cave – Php 35
  • Mangudlong Rock Resort – Php 20

Day 2

  • Boat Ticket (Camotes-Danao) – Php 180
  • Terminal fee – Php 5
  • Pedicab to Danao Terminal – Php 15
  • Jeepney Fare (Danao to Mandaue) – Php 30

Other expenses:

  • Tent Rental – Php 350* (Our friends slept here.)
  • Aircon Room at Bella Vista Mare Resort – Php 1450*

* This is where we slept.

** Food expenses are not included here because we have different preferences. Rest assured, food in Camotes Island are of reasonable prices.

 

We hope you find this travel guide useful. 🙂

‘Til our next wander!

Xoxo, Ace and Demi